I DONT NEED A REASON #shesarebelandshellnevereverbeanygood

I DONT NEED A REASON #shesarebelandshellnevereverbeanygood

Mind-Cruton: I’m Such a Sap

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(Source: david-tavityan, via caseyagogo)

dedicationsthekey:

aworldinadream:

dope-complex:

hollycourt55377:

shesbackatit:

a beautiful disaster | vizually▲ill

Her skirt though

her everything tbh

YASSS

Wow.

Yessss boo!

I didn’t reblog this person the first time I saw the treacherously perfect outfit and I apologize because I was SO WRONG 

(via the-one-for-me)

willoughbooby:

Beyoncé and Solange at Coachella - April 12, 2014

Sisters

(via ceedling)

blackfashion:

Hat: Thrifted, Bandeau Top: Primark, Pants and Belt: River Island, Jewellery: Rokit, H&M, DKNY, Topshop, Primark
Name: Zee
Instagram: @zeemcskotie
Location: London
Submitted By: http://theblaqchronicles.tumblr.com/
Photographed By: @VeeartMediaCEO (twitter)

OH
OH 

blackfashion:

Hat: Thrifted, Bandeau Top: Primark, Pants and Belt: River Island, Jewellery: Rokit, H&M, DKNY, Topshop, Primark

Name: Zee

Instagram: @zeemcskotie

Location: London

Submitted By: http://theblaqchronicles.tumblr.com/

Photographed By: @VeeartMediaCEO (twitter)

OH

OH 

(via angelsscream)

archemind:

Makpal Abdrazakova
27-year-old berkutchi (she hunts competitively with a trained eagle) from central Kazhakstan
Story here

archemind:

Makpal Abdrazakova

27-year-old berkutchi (she hunts competitively with a trained eagle) from central Kazhakstan

Story here

(via quicksilverwracked)

Out the house #fuckitmang

Out the house #fuckitmang

(via femalerappers)

Mind-Cruton: This Blog Is Shit

You should follow my blog that isn’t shit. 

Tugging The Wanting-To-Finish-Out. 

It’s arty and smarty and not that farty. 

This blog is farty. 

(So farty.) 

gabifresh:

The gabifresh x swimsuitsforall bikini has been restocked and is now available to buy here! For more photos from this shoot, check out gabifresh.com! If you reblog, please keep this caption <3

TOO CUTE

(via ashleighthelion)

"First you’re taught to fear a phantom, a man in black, a man with a knife, a man who’ll pounce in dark alleys. Well-intentioned women—mothers, aunts, teachers—will train you to protect yourself: Don’t wear your hair in a ponytail; it’s easier to grab. Hold your keys in one hand; hold your pepper spray in the other. Avoid dark alleys. When you reach young adulthood, the lessons change. They acquire an undertone of disgust: Don’t drink so much. Don’t wear such short skirts. You’re sending mixed signals; you’re putting yourself at risk. If you follow the advice and it never happens—if you end up one of the three out of four—you can convince yourself that safety is a product of your own making, a reflection of inherent goodness. But if you’re paying attention, you realize something doesn’t add up. Because it keeps happening: to your sisters; to your friends; to little girls and grown women you’ll never meet, in places like Cleveland, Texas; Steubenville, Ohio; New Delhi. Good people, bad people, neutral. It keeps happening in TV shows and novels and movies—they open on the missing girl, the dead girl, the raped girl. If you’re paying attention, you begin to realize that it isn’t happening. It is being done. And you are not safe. You have never been safe. You were born with a bulls-eye on your back. All you have ever been is lucky.

Cara Hoffman’s 2011 novel So Much Pretty opens on the dead girl. Her name is Wendy White; she’s been missing for five months, and within the first fifty pages we learn that her body “was put to use for months before being found.” In another book, my heart would sink, reading those words. Among many other things, I’m tired of the way this story is told in fiction: from the point of view of the male detective, grizzled and weary, shaking his head over some beautiful broken body. The man represents cynicism; the body, innocence. By the end, his jaded worldview will be confirmed, or he will be saved—either way, he’ll need to see the body. I’ve read enough of this genre to know I’m tired of it. I’m tired of the way it puts women’s bodies to use, as footnotes. The dead girl is the beginning of the man’s story. Being dead, hers has ended before page one."

Katie Coyle on So Much Pretty for The Female Gaze (via christinefriar)

(via christinefriar)